Tag Archives: celery

Wheat Berry, Kale and Cranberry Salad

Wheat berries are whole, unprocessed wheat kernels in their most natural form. Wheat berries resemble other hearty whole grains, such as barley. They are extremely nutritious and offer a crunchy texture. Wheat berries offer all of the nutrients of a whole grain as they contain the germ, endosperm and bran. Continue reading

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Chicken Pot Pies in Puff Pastry Shells

Recipe courtesy of http://www.katiescucina.com/2013/09/chicken-pot-pies-puff-pastry-shells/

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Chicken Pot Pies in Puff Pastry Shells

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Yield: 12

 Ingredients

  • · 1 tbsp chicken fat (or oil)
  • · 3 carrots peeled and sliced
  • · 2 celery stalks, diced
  • · 1 onion, diced
  • · 1/2 cup frozen peas
  • · 1/4 cup chicken broth
  • · 1 tsp poultry seasoning
  • · 2 cups shredded rotisserie chicken (cooked)
  • · 1 tbsp cornstarch
  • · 1-1/2 cups whole milk
  • · 1 tbsp fresh parsley + more for garnish

 Directions

  1. Heat a large pot to medium heat then add chicken fat (or oil), carrots, celery, and onion. Cook for 5 minutes with lid on. Then add frozen peas, chicken brother and poultry seasoning. Mix well, and cook for an additional 5 minutes with lid on.
  2. Once the veggies are soft sprinkle in 1 tablespoon of cornstarch over veggies, mix well then pour 1-1/2 cups of whole milk into the pot. Milk well and cook for 5 minutes on medium heat. Stir in cooked shredded rotisserie chicken. Cook for 5 minutes until heated through. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon fresh parsley over the chicken pot pie mixture, stir and turn off heat.
  3. *While pot pie mixture cooks preheat oven and cook puff pastry shells to package instructions.
  4. Once the puff pastry shells are cooked, cut out the middles, stuff each shell with chicken pot pie filling and then top with puff pastry lid. Serve and enjoy.

Notes

*If chicken pot pie mixture seems to dry add more milk until desired creamy consistency.

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Are There Any Real Benefits In Buying Organic Produce?

The controversy continues over the nutritional and health supremacy of organic fruits and produce over conventionally grown.  

Every week a new ‘definition’ point of view is established.  

Paula Maier - OrganicThese are some facts to take into account.

It has been found that in about 60% of studies that organic food is higher in some nutrients than conventionally produced food.  

These statistics can be refuted by other studies, but you need to look if the studies that are being compared are done on the same physical area over-time.  Otherwise you are comparing apples to oranges because the soil being tested is not the same.

Polyphenols are antioxidants and may be one of the main reasons fruits and vegetables are healthy for us.  

One issue to consider is what the organic growing process filters versus conventional growing.  

Plants grown organically have to grow stronger from the start because they have to fend off a range of insects and growth disease on their own.  

This ‘defensive compound’ they create may help to keep us healthier according to Charles Benbrook, a researcher at Washington State University. He is with the National Academy of Sciences as chief science consultant for the Organic Center.  

He states. “If you keep putting on more and more nitrogen fertilizer the way conventional farms do, you drive yields up and produce bigger plants.  But, this dilutes the plants’ levels of vitamins, minerals and polyphenols.”

Shelf-life and sugar content

Apples, celery, pears, potatoes, strawberries, sweet bell peppers and sweet potatoes are higher in pesticides on the Dietary Risk Index (DRI), and lower on the Organic Risk Index (ORI).  This affects their shelf-life, and sugar content.  Also to be considered is if the plants are grown domestically (where they are subject to our mandates and regulations about growing procedures) or abroad.

Bottom Line?  Seek out the information in DRI from the EPA and other agencies, and imported vs. domestic statistics when you are making decisions about whether you want to buy organic or domestic fruits and vegetables.  

Make informed decisions with all of the facts.

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